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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
extensively. some has warned it has gotten too big. they say it is damaging the environment and ruining people's health. >> from the center, you cannot see what is happening in alps. people have been quarrying marble here since ancient times. even today, a bathtub or garden walk away made of this marble is considered the height of luxury. the region is dependent on marble. excavating equipment has been used and it has changed the surrounding durant -- surrounding landscape entirely. what was once an individual craft has turned into a mechanized industry. environmental activists are fighting against the destruction of the home region. >> to save the alps, the quarrries should be closed if they are at 1,400 meters or higher. >> a century ago, 120,000 tons of marble were quarried here annually. today, it is 5 million tons a year. only a quarter of this is raw material for stonecutters or studios like this one in carrera. the whole new industry is being served. today, 3/4 of the marble is ground to dust. these facilities, most belonging to multinational corporations, would not allow us to film ins
per day. bees live in highly organized societies that adapt rapidly to their environment, but they are under increasing threat from humans. this film director spent five years researching why bees were dying out. his film aims to wake people up to the problem. >> over the last six years, 30% of the population has died every year in europe, north america, and china. in parts of switzerland, the number is 70%. sometimes in america, it is between 50% and 70%, but on average, 30% every year. if it keeps going on like that, our valleys will soon look pretty sad. >> they're dying because of mites, bacteria, and parasites, a result of large-scale beekeeping. >> >> it is like wit -- >> it is like we are capitalists. we want to grow. total global domination. >> miller looks after 15,000 hives. he moves them between plantations of apple and -- allman and apple blossom, transporting them all across the u.s. -- plantations of almond and apple blossom. >> in reality, agriculture has to work in partnership with the bees, but when i approached agriculture department's in switzerland, th
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went in an interview bin laden, the last western journalist the trekked into the mountains in afghanistan, and we did a prime-time special or two, but i had some dealings with the military in washington he said their biggest concern was an act of domestic terrorism. we had active discussions about doing more. in retrospect wish
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and the environment. we're america's natural gas. at meineke i have options... like oil changes starting at $19.95. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> a scary day for harry reid on the campaign trail. the senate majority leader hospitalized after a car accident. rd for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ >>> with the election less than two weeks away the air waves are flooded with ads from the romney and obama campaigns, especially in swing states. at this point the message is critical and the way it's delivered can mean just as much, right down to who appears in the ads, what they're wearing, what kind of voice is narrating. looking at the advertising end game for both campaigns, it seems they're trying to strike similar notes in very different ways. take
orion 800. we're exiting the nostorm environment from the northwest. >> jessica, what are you seeing inside the hurricane? >> on the northwest of the storm, we are in a lot of turbulence right now, occasional, moderate turbulence. there are spiral bands of precipitation around the northwest of the storm. it's still a very tropical storm in the center but on the northwest, it has more cold front features to it. >> what does that mean for the intensity of this storm from what you're witnessing on the northwest side? does that mean it's going to make it more powerful? >> i couldn't really understand your question. >> okay. >> but i believe what you're asking is being a tropical storm becoming more subtropical, the wind speed is spreading out. there's a higher wind speed that will affect the larger area. highest wind speeds we found 105 miles out from the storm. >> okay, jessica williams, thank you very much. she's on board a plane right now going through the storm. and obviously she's witnessing some turbulence, she said, and also a lot of wind and a lot of rain. you can expect this one
detail what he called the toxic environment at goldman, one that encouraged taking advantage of its clients. his book is now in stores. greg, good morning. thanks for coming on. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in the book, you frame the leadership of goldman sachs as having made a choice between profit and reputation. when did they make that swing? >> as your viewers will know, earlier in the decade, there were a lot of things that were deregulated like complicated derivatives. it got to the point where banks saw they could make more money using their client information to bet for themselves as opposed to facilitating for a client business. ultimately by the time i left for firm, three quarters of the money was being made in the training business, as opposed to the original reason for wall street, which is helping companies raise money and merging. it's been a real revenue shift and also a behavior shift where taking advantage of clients has become the norm. >> what you write about are ethics issues, not really legal issues, per se. >> that's the great irony of the crisis.
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
. that's good for your pocketbook. that's good for our national security, it's good for the environment. and one reason we have been able to -- we have confidence we can keep on making progress is we have doubled the fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks so in the middle of the next decade, you'll go twice as far on a gallon of gas. i want us now to build on that progress. we've got to keep making those investments. i don't want fuel efficient cars and long lasting batteries and wind turbines and solar panels produced in china. i want them produced right here in new hampshire. i want them made right here in america, and we can do that. number three, we have to make it a national mission to educate our kids and train our workers better than anybody else in the world. i want to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers because we know that's an area where we can't afford to fall behind. i want to train 2 million workers at our community colleges for the skills that businesses are hiring for right now. and i want to work with colleges and universities to make sure that tuition
sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it work ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. and hear what a little lyric can do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. [ male announcer ] it's time for medicare open enrollment. are you ready? time to compare plans and see what's new. you don't have to make changes, but it's good to look. maybe you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ >>> her we are top of the hour. i'm brooke baldwin. these are live pictures, midtown manhattan. this is slated to be tallest building in new york with residences. this is west 57th between sixth and seventh. we're going to talk about that because in looking at these pictures before and the after on the left and the right-hand side of your screens, this is evidence of the storm's rath before
in creating the overall environment, the actual act is pretty quickly attributed directly on the insurgents. >> general -- >> thank you. just a final remark by me on this issue. protecting the civilian population is an absolute principle of this operation. without that protection this operation, in my view, would not be viable. and i think that is the view of all my counterparts and afghans as well. >> [inaudible] >> general and dame mary, the north atlantic council decides the rules of engagement. does the north atlantic council direct that in those rules of engagement if there was a possibility of a civilian casualty, that engagement should not take place, or is it a judgment call given down to the respective commander at the level that it's required to be made? in other words, if there's a possibility of a is civilian being hurt -- of a civilian being hurt by, say, a drone strike, it doesn't go ahead, or is it a judgment call made at another level? >> no. >> we are not allowed to give details on rules of engagement. >> indeed, i won't. but what i can say, the political guidance always gi
productive, less tense environment in the region. then you take israel even to compare it to taiwan, that issue was bracketed between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over the us rail and palestinian issue. but i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with iran just like china. when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of over three million chinese. they didn't just have a nuclear weapons program, they had tested nuclear weapons. the interest here is what is in the u.s. national interest. even there this is another critical challenge for the united states. as middle eastern populations become more empowered and have more of a say in each of their countries, they are not going to vote for, they are not going to support a secular, democratic u.s. model for their governance. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept or lobby for a complete copy of the islamic republic
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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